Topic: Educator Effectiveness

Blog post Megan BorenSREB Program Specialist

Educator Effectiveness is About Learning and Growth Opportunities
And that should never end

Lessons learned from three years of work in 8 states

Providing real-time feedback and growth opportunities to teachers — the real purpose of educator effectiveness systems — means that school leaders have to understand and value the skills to be instructional leaders and be properly trained on those skills. In any career path, professionals need to know how they’re doing and need help honing their craft. Teaching is no different; teachers need a coach, they need feedback.

Publication February 20198 pages

Improving Educator Feedback and Support: Lessons from Eight SREB States

SREB partnered with eight state departments of education from 2015 to 2018 to transform how they supported the professional growth of teachers and administrators. This report summarizes how state departments invested grant funding, the impact of the investments on the states’ strategies and success, and key lessons from the states’ efforts and SREB’s grant process.

Blog post Matthew Smith, SREB Research Associate

Getting the Balance Right
Reconsidering the Mix of Teacher Licensure Measures

The SREB Teacher Preparation Commission called on state leaders to adopt practice-based assessments. These tests assess candidates’ readiness to lead a classroom and to apply lessons learned during coursework and clinical experiences.

Practice-based assessments have diagnostic value, meaning they provide performance data that educator preparation programs can use to identify strengths and opportunities for improvement. State agencies could use the assessment data to determine how they will provide technical assistance to preparation programs.

Blog post Matthew SmithSREB Research Associate

In This Together: How States Foster Safe Learning Environments

As legislatures convene regular sessions, we at SREB have observed an uptick in bills focused on school safety. Some propose dramatic changes in the way school districts hire and train security personnel, develop emergency plans, or address students’ mental and emotional health. Others make technical changes to standing laws in order to lower the barriers districts face in creating safe learning environments.